Montgomery's Covered Bridges

Slow down sign at a Montgomery bridgeMontgomery's seven covered bridges provide a fascinating glimpse into the past. Each bridge has a history, sometimes a rather troubled one. Today their survival hangs in the balance. Maintenance is the main problem. The bridges were never designed to take modern traffic. Montgomery is not a wealthy town and has a hard time finding the thousands of dollars required to keep the bridges in useable condition. The State of Vermont provides little help arguing that the bridges are hardly practical. The subject of bridge maintenance is always a contentious issue at Town meetings. We'd like to suggest that Montgomery launch a national "adopt -a- covered bridge" campaign.

Note: The town of Montgomery has dismantled the Gibou Road bridge and put it into storage until they can afford to rebuild it.

 

Vermont has over 100 covered bridges, many of them still in use. In times past, they served as places for advertising, a place where children sometimes played and where couples stopped for some cuddles while out on a drive in their buggies. Sadly these bridges are becoming relics of the past except where local funding can ensure their proper upkeep. The Middle Bridge in Woodstock is a case in point. This bridge is often displayed in our header area.

 

Map Shows where the bridges are located in Montgomery Center and Montgomery Village

FULLER BRIDGE

Fuller Bridge Located on South Richford Road in Montgomery Village

Construction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1890. The bridge crosses the Black Falls Brook on the edge of town and is on South Richford Road.

Appearance-wise, the bridge looks in good shape, but it is said to need about $100, 000 worth of reconstruction work. The bridge is in everyday use.

2. Creamery Bridge

Creamery Bridge Road, Montgomery Village. Town Highway #11 (Hill West Road). Go 2.6 miles, then left onto the Creamery Bridge Road, about a 1/2 mile.

Construction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1883. Crossing is WestHill Brook and Creamery Bridge Road.

View a narrated slide show of the Creamery bridge (Flash).

Creamery BridgeThe bridge is hard to find and is no longer in use. It's foundations are in very poor shape. It is surrounded by thick foliage which makes for nice pictures in the fall. Below the bridge you will find people bathing in the West Hill Brook on hot summer days.

 

3.Hectorville Bridge

The Hectorville Bridge is Town Lattice, built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1883. As of the summer of 2005, the bridge was storage along Route 118 between Montgomery Center and Montgomery Village. It is estimated that the cost of putting this bridge back over the Trout River is more than $300,000!

No Picture Available

 

Comstock Bridge

Comstock Bridge in Montgomery Village, VermontConstruction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1883. The bridge spans the Trout River and Comstock Road. The bridge is located in Montgomery Village. It is in pretty good shape.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Hutchins Bridge

Hutchins BridgeFollowing Route 118 south, make right onto Hutchins Bridge. Construction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1883. The bridge crosses the South Branch of the Trout River and Hutchins Bridge Road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Longley Bridge

Longley Bridge Road, Montgomery Village. Construction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1863. Crossing is over the Trout River. The bridge ison Town Highway #4. which is Longley Bridge Road

Longley BridgeThis bridge is in use and is in fairly good shape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Hopkins Bridge

Hopkins Bridge on the Montgomery-Enosburg TownlineRoute 118 Enosburg. Construction is town lattice built by Sheldon and Savannah Jewett in 1875. Crossing is Trout River and Hopkins Road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

View interview with Bill Branthoover on Montgomery's Bridges. Mr. Branthoover is a member of the Montgomery Historical Society, and has written a book about Montgomery's history and its covered bridges.

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